More About Concussion

Many concussions that require emergency treatment are because of falls, motor vehicle accidents, assaults, and sports injuries. Children, young adults, and older adults are at especially high risk for concussions and may take longer to recover after a concussion. People who have had concussions before are more likely to have them again.

  • A blow or a jolt to the head can cause a concussion
  • Symptoms such as headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, or trouble thinking can happen right away, or they may come on gradually over time.
  • Call a healthcare provider right away or go to the emergency room if a person loses consciousness after a blow to the head.
  • Getting plenty of rest is an important part of treating concussions.

You can take a number of steps to help reduce your risk for a concussion or prevent it in your children:

  • Wear a seat belt every time you're in a motor vehicle.
  • Make sure your children use the proper safety seat, booster seat, or seat belt.
  • Never drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol. 
  • Wear a helmet for activities such as riding a bike or motorcycle, playing contact sports, skiing, horseback riding, and snowboarding.
  • Reduce your risk for falls by eliminating clutter in your home, removing slippery area rugs, and installing grab bars in the bathroom if needed, especially for older adults.
  • Never work on a ladder if you feel dizzy or lightheaded. Alcohol can make you dizzy. Some medicines also can make you dizzy or affect your balance.
  • Have your vision checked at least once a year. Poor vision can increase your risk for falls and other types of accidents.