Juvenile Dermatomyositis

Juvenile Dermatomyositis, or JDM, presents primarily as weakness, but other symptoms such as rash, muscle weakness, inability to walk, fever and joint pain can also present. While juvenile arthritis occurs mainly in the joints, JDM centers on the skin and muscle, only sometimes causing painful joints.

Our pediatric rheumatology specialists provide highly specialized diagnosis and treatment for children and teens that have auto-immune diseases and disorders of the musculoskeletal system, including dermatomyositis.

Treatments for Juvenile Dermatomyositis

In order to diagnose a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis, a muscle biopsy is taken and analyzed. Patients who suffer from JDM are typically genetically predisposed to this disease, which is often aggravated by environmental triggers. JDM occurs at any age and can be sent into remission. Our pediatric rheumatology experts will work with you and other pediatric specialists toward that goal.

Biologics
These new drugs are called “biologics” because they’re made from active biological material, rather than chemical compounds. Many are monoclonal antibodies, or drugs that behave like human antibodies trained to attack a specific threat to the immune system. Some of these medications are given through skin injections or intravenous infusion. Patients have access to the top-notch on-site infusion center.

Non-Biological Disease Modifying Ant-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs)
Different chemical treatments, such as low dose Methotrexate, may be needed to control a child’s JIA.

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
Using prescription medicine can be an effective treatment for JIA. Our team continues to monitor children and perform routine follow-ups (often every 2-3 months).

Occupational and Physical Therapy
Based on a child’s physical demands and symptoms, working with a physical or occupational therapist may benefit a patient.