More About Shoulder Dislocation

Your shoulder can dislocate in several ways, including:

  • Forward and downward dislocation. These are the most common types of dislocations. They usually result from falling on your outstretched hand or on your shoulder itself.
  • Backward dislocation. This type of dislocation may be caused by a direct blow to the front of your shoulder, or the violent twisting of your upper arm.

Your shoulder can be either partially or completely dislocated. Partial dislocation is when the head of your upper arm is partially out of your shoulder socket. Complete dislocation is when the head of your upper arm is completely out of your shoulder socket.

Your healthcare provider discusses with you specific treatment for a shoulder dislocation, based on:

  • Your age, overall health, and medical history
  • Extent of your injury
  • Your tolerance for specific medicines, procedures, or therapies
  • Expectations for the course of your injury
  • Your opinion or preference

Treatment may include:

  • Moving the head of your upper arm bone back into your shoulder joint, usually with an anesthetic
  • Immobilizing your shoulder with a sling after reduction
  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery, if nonsurgical measures do not restore stability